Github Desktop Lfs

GitHub.com Moving a file in your repository to Git Large File Storage If you've set up Git LFS, and you have an existing file in your repository that needs to be tracked in Git LFS, you need to first remove it from your repository. After installing Git LFS and configuring Git LFS tracking, you can move files from Git's regular tracking to Git LFS. Set up versioning for a new project and use Git LFS to handle large assets which don't fit the normal flow of Git versioning.Important pages:GitHub: https://. To use Git LFS, you will need a Git LFS aware host such as Bitbucket Cloud or Bitbucket Server.Repository users will need to have the Git LFS command-line client installed, or a Git LFS aware GUI client such as Sourcetree.Fun fact: Steve Streeting, the Atlassian developer who invented Sourcetree, is also a major contributor to the Git LFS project, so Sourcetree and Git LFS work together rather. To associate a file type in your repository with Git LFS, enter git lfs track followed by the name of the file extension you want to automatically upload to Git LFS. For example, to associate a.psd file, enter the following command: $ git lfs track '.psd' Adding path.psd. Click Open with GitHub Desktop to clone and open the repository with GitHub Desktop. And, using the Finder window, navigate to a local path where you want to clone the repository. Note: If the repository is configured to use LFS, you will be prompted to initialize Git LFS.

You can use GitHub to clone remote repositories to GitHub Desktop.

Tip: You also can use GitHub Desktop to clone repositories that exist on GitHub. For more information, see 'Cloning a repository from GitHub Desktop.'

  1. Sign in to GitHub and GitHub Desktop before you start to clone.

  2. On GitHub, navigate to the main page of the repository.

  3. Above the list of files, click Code.

  4. Click Open with GitHub Desktop to clone and open the repository with GitHub Desktop.

  5. Click Choose... and, using the Finder window, navigate to a local path where you want to clone the repository.

    Note: If the repository is configured to use LFS, you will be prompted to initialize Git LFS.

  6. Click Clone.

  1. Sign in to GitHub and GitHub Desktop before you start to clone.

  2. On GitHub, navigate to the main page of the repository.

  3. Above the list of files, click Code.

  4. Click Open with GitHub Desktop to clone and open the repository with GitHub Desktop.

  5. Click Choose... and, using Windows Explorer, navigate to a local path where you want to clone the repository.

    Note: If the repository is configured to use LFS, you will be prompted to initialize Git LFS.

  6. Click Clone.

Github Large File

You can use GitHub Desktop to clone and fork repositories that exist on GitHub.

In this article

About local repositories

Repositories on GitHub are remote repositories. You can clone or fork a repository with GitHub Desktop to create a local repository on your computer.

You can create a local copy of any repository on GitHub that you have access to by cloning the repository. If you own a repository or have write permissions, you can sync between the local and remote locations. For more information, see 'Syncing your branch.'

Github

When you clone a repository, any changes you push to GitHub will affect the original repository. To make changes without affecting the original project, you can create a separate copy by forking the repository. You can create a pull request to propose that maintainers incorporate the changes in your fork into the original upstream repository. For more information, see 'About forks.'

Github

When you try to use GitHub Desktop to clone a repository that you do not have write access to, GitHub Desktop will prompt you to create a fork automatically. You can choose to use your fork to contribute to the original upstream repository or to work independently on your own project. Any existing forks default to contributing changes to their upstream repositories. You can modify this choice at any time. For more information, see 'Managing fork behavior'.

You can also clone a repository directly from GitHub or GitHub Enterprise. For more information, see 'Cloning a repository from GitHub to GitHub Desktop'.

Github Desktop 32-bit Download

Cloning a repository

  1. In the File menu, click Clone Repository.

  2. Click the tab that corresponds to the location of the repository you want to clone. You can also click URL to manually enter the repository location.

  3. Choose the repository you want to clone from the list.

  4. Click Choose... and navigate to a local path where you want to clone the repository.

  5. Click Clone.

Forking a repository

If you clone a repository that you do not have write access to, GitHub Desktop will create a fork. After creating or cloning a fork, GitHub Desktop will ask how you are planning to use the fork.

Github

  1. In the File menu, click Clone Repository.

  2. Click the tab that corresponds to the location of the repository you want to clone. You can also click URL to manually enter the repository location.

  3. Choose the repository you want to clone from the list.

  4. Click Choose... and navigate to a local path where you want to clone the repository.

  5. Click Clone.

  6. If you plan to use this fork for contributing to the original upstream repository, click To contribute to the parent project.

  7. If you plan to use this fork for a project not connected to the upstream, click For my own purposes.

  8. Click Continue.

Github Large File Storage

Managing fork behavior

You can change how a fork behaves with the upstream repository in GitHub Desktop.

  1. Open the Repository menu, then click Repository settings....

  2. Click Fork behavior, then select how you want to use the fork.

  3. Click Save.

Further reading