Informative Speech Outlines For Free

An informative speech outline can easily be created around inspirational people and their words of wisdom. Inspirational people - really good informative speech topics! Their lingering positive messages leave the audience feeling motivated and determined - a great goal for any speaker.


FREE Persuasive speech OUTLINE - absolutely essential for your speech. FREE outline and sample for you now. REMOVE the ANXIETY of writing your speech - why struggle any longer? Normally, there are four types of topics for informative speeches: concepts, objects, events, and processes. Like other types of speeches, an informative speech also has an introduction, body, and conclusion. So, make sure you do include all the parts in order to make the right kind of informative speech outline. Learn how to create an informative speech that will provide your audience with new knowledge regarding a given topic. Informative Speech Outline. The outline for an informative speech is just like an informative essay outline. There are two different ways to outline your speech: one is the complete sentence format and the other one is the key points format.


Too much information - too little time? What information should I include? How do I structure a meaningful speech, with an original slant that doesn't merely list fact upon fact? Well, follow the simple informative speech outline listed below - it's that simple!


INFORMATIVE SPEECH OUTLINE

Full Name: State your character's full name and include a catchy slogan.

Humble Beginnings: Many inspirational people had humble beginnings that shaped their character, their goals and their resolve. Briefly share these experiences in your informative speech outline with your audience .

Opinions are Not always Facts: Too often inspirational people were told that they were unlikely to succeed or that their ventures would fail. Include one or two example in your speech.

Misfortune Overcome: Detail how your inspirational character overcame obstacles - either obstacles of a personal nature or in their quest towards achieving their goal.

Time is Precious: Inspirational people very often had time constraints that they needed to adhere to. These time constraints may often have been self-imposed, driven by their desire to succeed or even imposed by outside forces.

Success - a Legacy Lives On: End your speech by describing your inspirational character's ultimate success and possibly their contribution to mankind.

Thomas Alva Edison - A Man of Practical Genius

Thomas Edison came from humble beginnings. As he stepped off the boat that brought him from Boston and took his first step in New York, he had only one small bag and a single dollar in his possession. The only shelter that he could find was in a battery room of a company on Wall Street and this is where he spent his very first night in New York.

It has been said that opinions are not always facts! This is certainly true in the case of Thomas Edison. He was born in 1847 in a little town near to Milan, Ohio on the shore of Lake Erie. Close friends and relatives called him 'Al'. Although Thomas was quite an intelligent young boy, one of his teachers ventured their opinion and suggested to his mother that Al had an 'addled' brain. His furious mother removed him from the school immediately and taught Thomas herself. Thomas Edison would in time prove that opinions are seldom facts!

Thomas Edison endured further misfortune in his lifetime. After having overcome a bout of scarlet fever and recurring ear infections in childhood and an apparent blow to the side of his head, he remained hard of hearing for the rest of his life because of a burst eardrum.

Informative Speech Presentation Outline

He realized that time was precious. He wanted to succeed. Thomas Edison is quoted as saying: ' I am not discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward.' And forward is the direction that Thomas also strove towards. Thomas Edison is generally well know for inventing the practical light bulb. His practical genius extended however to include many other inventions, perhaps less well known, but still significant.

One day in 1877 Edison was working on a machine designed to record telegraphic signals on a wax cylinder. While making minor adjustments to the machine and talking to the mechanic, a needle on the machine pricked Edison's finger when he made a specific sound.

Edison immediately made a rough sketch of a design that he wanted his mechanics to begin constructing. It was a machine designed to record and reproduce sounds. Upon completion, Edison picked up the ear-trumpet and spoke the first ever recorded words: 'Mary had a little lamb; its fleece was white as snow...' - the phonograph was born.

Thomas Edison is quoted as saying, 'I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.' So every time we turn on a light bulb and every time we listen to music, Thomas Edison's personal successes ensure that his legacy lives on.

This informative speech outline can also be used effectively to present an informative speech of a historical nature. A good informative speech topic like 'Alexander the Great' or even the 'D-Day Landings' would easily fit this outline! What about a free informative speech 'Michael Johnson - Ready, Steady...Go' ; 'Julius Caesar - Builder of an Empire' or 'Martin Luther King - A Man of Dreams'? The possibilities abound. Let's begin!


Return from Informative Speech Outline to Words of Wisdom
Malcolm X Speeches As Free Informative Speech Topics
Topics For Informative Speeches - Impressive And Educational
Michael Jackson Death...Superstar, Father, Son, Brother - Remembered Always
Unique Informative Speech Topics - Challenging And Thought Provoking
Informative Speech Introduction - Captivating From The Outset


I. Start with Main Points

A. Look at the information that you gathered and try to find a way to organize your main points (chronological, spatial, topical, problem-solution, cause-effect). For example if you want to tell your audience about your partners background, education, and hobbies you would organize them in that order – first main point = background, second main point = education, and the third main point would be hobbies. It would only make sense to tell us the person’s background first.

B. You should have at least two and no more than three main points for your short introduction speech.

C. State the main points in full sentences (not in fragments). Also, devote an appropriate amount of time to each one.

II. Next, Make Components of the Main Points with Sub-points

A. Look at the information you gathered that fits under each main point and come up with key ideas that belong to these main points. These will be your sub-points. You need at least two sub-points for each main point.

B. Sub-points can be in complete sentences or fragments.

III. Support Your Sub-points with Sub-Sub-points (your facts and examples)

A. You don’t necessarily need sub-sub-points for your short introduction speech; however, most of you will have sub-sub-points in your speech, because these are the facts and information that support what you are saying. You could include a quote from your partner.

B. Sub-sub-points you use for supporting your sub-points--can be personal experiences your interviewee has shared with you.

IV. Use Connectives throughout Your Speech (refer to the connectives handout in your handout packet)

A. Know what transitions and signposts are, and when to use them.

B. Label and include all connectives in your preparation outline.

The Following is a Template and Guidelines FOR AN INTRODUCTION SPEECH PREPARATION OUTLINE: MAKE CERTAIN THAT YOU LABEL EVERYTHING! (All labels are in parentheses--include all labels and visual framework in your outline. You may have 2 OR 3 main points.). You can use the following template for your Preparation outline by typing your information into the template and replacing the explanations. This is just an example/template. You may have only two main points, and two sub-points for each main point. You may not have any sub-sub-points, sub-sub-sub-points. In your introduction and conclusion you will include the same number of elements. In the introduction the Attention getter is always first and the Preview is last. The order of the other elements is up to you. You will include your title Specific Purpose, and Central Idea in the spaces provided. Your outline will start after the following line of asterisks. Delete this entire explanation ABOVE.

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Specific Purpose: This is what your main points must support or prove. Tell me in one sentence what the purpose of your speech is–for example I will introduce Jack [interviewee’s name will be Jack for this example] to my audience.

Central Idea:Summarize your speech/outline in one sentence. Should clearly sum up all of your main points. A declarative sentence.

For example: Jack has overcome many difficulties in his pursuit of a degree in Education, yet still has time to enjoy life.

INTRODUCTION

I. (Attention Getter) This could be a story or anything you know will GRAB your audience's attention. “Albert Einstein once said that in the middle of difficulties lie opportunities. We all experience difficulties in our lives, however, what makes some of us different from others is how we deal with the difficulties. The person I will introduce to you today sees difficulties as opportunities.”

II. (Reveal Topic) Reveal your topic to your audience–just your topic–not a preview.

“Today I have the opportunity to introduce you to Jack Hart, our new classmate.”

III. (Credibility Statement) Answer the question 'Why should we listen to YOU?' Give some type of factual information or some reference that will show that you know what you are talking about. This could be the fact that you had an extensive in-class interview with your interviewee. Perhaps you did additional research, or you telephoned your interviewee.

“I interviewed Jack in class, and spoke with him on the phone. Before the interview I didn’t Know Jack—now I do.”

Sample Informative Speech Outlines

IV. (Preview) Briefly reveal your topic and state what your main points will be.

For example: “Today, I will tell you about Jack’s

A.Main point 1 goes here “background”

B.Main point 2 goes here“education”

C. Main point 3 goes here“and his hobbies

(TRANSITION: Transitions are used to go smoothly from one part/point of the speech to another. Include in all of your connectives the exact wording you will use in your speech. “Let us start with Jack’s background.”)

BODY

I. (MAIN POINT 1) Your first main point goes here-it MUST be one complete sentence.

For example: “Jack has overcome many difficulties in his life.”

A. (SUBPOINT) You MUST have at least two subpoints under each main point. This could be one complete sentence or a phrase of fragment.

“When Jack was nine years old he lost his father to cancer.”

1. (SUB-SUBPOINT) This is where the specific examples from your research are included to support your main points. You can use quotes, examples, stories, facts, statistics, analogies, etc…. Be sure to cite all sources.

“Jack quickly became the ‘Man’ of the house.”

a. (Sub-sub-subpoint) Further examples and information to support your subpoint. You can use abbreviations for the label--Example = (SSSP).

“Having two younger brothers to care for gave Jack a great deal of responsibility at an early age.”

b. (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you must have a ‘b.’

“Every chance he could he helped his Mother around the house.”

2. (SSP) More of the above. If you have a ‘1.’ you must have a ‘2.’

B. (SP) You Must have a ‘B.’ You must include at least 2 subpoints for each Main Point

1. (SSP) Sub-Sub-Points and SSSPs are optional, however, you will most likely have both in your speech to support your subpoints and main points.

a. (SSSP) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.

b. (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you need a ‘b.’

2. (SSP)

C. (SUBPOINT--optional)

1. (SSP)

2. (SSP)

TRANSITION: A transition is used to go smoothly from the 1st Main Point to the 2nd Main Point.

(Include the exact wording of your transition) For example: “Now you know a little bit about Jack’s background let me tell you about his educational.”

II. (MP 2) Your second MAIN POINT goes here. Follow the same format that you used for the first main point. “Jack has some specific educational goals.”

A. (SUBPOINT) You should have at least two subpoints under each main point. This could be one complete sentence. You cannot have an A without a B.

1. (SUB-SUBPOINT) This is where the specific examples from your research are included to support your main points. You can use quotes, examples, stories. Be sure to cite all sources. If you have a ‘1.’ you must have a ‘2..’

a. (Sub-sub-subpoint) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.

b. (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you need a ‘b.’

2. (SSP) More of the above.

B. (SP)

1. (SSP)

a. (SSSP) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.

b. (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you need a ‘b.’

2. (SSP)

C. (SUBPOINT--optional)

1. (SSP)

2. (SSP)

TRANSITION: A transition is used to go smoothly from the 2nd Main Point to the 3rd Main Point.

(Include the exact wording of your transition)

III. (MP 3) Your third MAIN POINT goes here. (The total number of main points is optional, however, three main points seems to be the number easiest to manage as a speaker, and the easiest to remember for your audience.) “Jack enjoys life every chance he gets.”

A. (SUBPOINT) You should have at least two subpoints under each main point. This could be one complete sentence. You cannot have an A without a B.

1. (SUB-SUBPOINT) This is where the specific examples from your research are included to support your main points. You can use quotes, examples, stories. Be sure to cite all sources. If you have a ‘1.’ you must have a ‘2..’

a. (Sub-sub-subpoint) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.

b. (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you need a ‘b.’

2. (SSP) More of the above.

B. (SP)

1. (SSP)

a. (SSSP) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.

b. (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you need a ‘b.’

2. (SSP)

C. (SUBPOINT--optional)

1. (SSP)

2. (SSP)

TRANSITION: A Transition is used to transition smoothly from the body of your speech into the conclusion. (Include in your transitional statement your exact wording)

“We can see that Jack enjoys life – let us review what makes Jack who he is today.”

CONCLUSION

I. (Summary Statement) Summarize your main points. Be specific and concise. Give an example from each main point. “Jack has overcome many losses and difficulties in his life. He has helped raise his two younger brothers. While helping raise his siblings he decided that he would like to pursue a career as a Teacher. Jack is not all work and no play—Jack enjoys surfing and he loves working with children. Jack has combined his two passions by teaching surfing to children in the Maui Youth Program.”

II. (Memorable Closing Statement) Leave your audience with something to think about. A memorable close that refers back to the attention getter creates psychological unity for your audience. “At one time or another you may have thought to yourself that You Don’t Know Jack, however, now you do. Jack has found nothing but opportunities in the difficulties he has faced – I encourage you to take the opportunity to get to know Jack—it won’t be difficult. Let’s welcome him to our class.”

Writing the Conclusion

You might recall on introductions the fact that audiences tend to put a lot of emphasis on their first and final impressions of a speaker (technically known as the primacy/recency effect). Because of this, it is very important to finish your speech with something great. If you have ever seen a stand-up comedian perform, you will find that they save their best jokes for the end of their set, for this very reason.

To end your speech with impact, you can use a lot of the devices discussed in the attention-getting section of the introductions page such as: quotations, jokes, anecdotes, audience involvement, questions, etc.

One of the best ways to conclude a speech is to tie the conclusion into the introduction. For example, you might begin your speech by telling a suspenseful story that relates to your topic, but save the end of the story for the very end of your speech. Or refer back to the same quotation. Or refer to the joke that you told. Any of these strategies will give your speech a sense of connection and closure, and will leave the audience with a great final impression.

Informative speech template word

If you are delivering a persuasive speech, you might try a slightly different ending because your goal is not just to be remembered, it's to inspire people to take action. One way to do this is to issue a call-to-action. This means that you specifically tell your audience what actions you expect them to take related to your speech. Another way to inspire action with the conclusion of your speech is to appeal to their emotions. If you create a desired emotion within your audience, and then leave them with that emotion, they will take that emotion with them. For example: If you leave them feeling guilty about not-recycling by painting a bleak picture about the state of the Earth that their grandchildren will live in, then they might recall that emotion the next time they choose not to recycle and alter their behavior.

Leaving a strong final impression is the most important aspect of the conclusion, but their are some other necessary steps as well:

1. Making a smooth transition from the body of the speech to the conclusion is crucial. To do this, use a signpost known as a concluding statement. The most common concluding statements include: 'in conclusion', 'I leave you with', 'finally today', and other similarly obvious endings.

Speech

2. Just as it is important to preview a speech in the introduction, it is important to summarize the speech in the conclusion. The more the audience hears your main points, the more likely they are to remember them. By previewing, discussing, and summarizing your main points your audience will be exposed to them at least three times during your speech.

A good conclusion should be about 5-10% of the total speech length. Anything shorter that 5% means that the ending has come too abruptly. Anything more that 10%, and the audience may become restless. This brings up another point: If it sounds like a conclusion, you need to finish your speech in a reasonable amount of time. The conclusion is not the place to add new material.

This is a sample outline/guide for Introducing your classmate. After you gather and organize your information from your interview you could fill this out or type up your own outline using this one as a guide. If you decide to use this for your speaking outline please write legibly if you plan on using this during your speech. Just outline the information--Keywords and phrases. This is not a manuscript. Do not write out everything you are going to say during the speech – Outline your information.

INTRODUCTION

I. (Attention Getter) _____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

II. (Reveal your topic) __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

III. (Establish Credibility) _____________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IV. (Preview) _____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

(TRANSITION:____________________________________________________________________________________)

BODY

I. (First Main Point --main points are full sentences) _____________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

A. (Subpoint) ____________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

B. (Subpoint) ____________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

C. (Subpoint) ____________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

(TRANSITION:____________________________________________________________________________________)

II. (Second Main Point --main points are full sentences) _____________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

A. (Subpoint) ____________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

B. (Subpoint) ____________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

C. (Subpoint) ___________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) ________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) ________________________________________________________________________

(TRANSITION:____________________________________________________________________________________)

III. (Third Main Point --main points are full sentences) _____________________________________________________________________________________

Informative Speech Outlines For Free

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

A. (Subpoint) ____________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

B. (Subpoint) ____________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

C. (Subpoint) ____________________________________________________________________________

1. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

2. (Sub-subpoint) _________________________________________________________________________

(TRANSITION:____________________________________________________________________________________)

CONCLUSION

I. (Summary of Main points) _____________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

II. (Closing -- Clincher -- Tie this back to Attention