Microsoft Visual C++ 2019 Redistributable For Visual Studio 2019

For example, installing the Visual C 2019 redistributable will affect programs built with Visual C 2015 and 2017 also. However, installing the Visual C 2015 redistributable will not replace the newer versions of the files installed by the Visual C 2017 and 2019 redistributables. Not sure which Microsoft Visual C Redistributable package is for you, just download 'All Visual Studio C Runtimes' and get all of them What's New: Updated Visual C 2015-2019 runtime to.

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Note

Are you here because you're looking for a download of one of the Visual C++ Runtime files? Go to the Microsoft website and enter Visual C++ Redistributable in the search box. Download and install the redistributable package for the architecture of your computer (for example, x64 if you are running 64-bit Windows) and the version of Visual C++ (for example, 2015) that you need.

Redistributable files and licensing

When you deploy an application, you must also deploy the files that are required to support it. If any of these files are provided by Microsoft, check whether you're permitted to redistribute them. You'll find a link to the Visual Studio license terms in the IDE. Use the License terms link in the About Microsoft Visual Studio dialog box. Or, download the relevant EULAs and licenses from the Visual Studio License Directory.

To view the 'REDIST list' that's referenced in the 'Distributable Code' section of the Visual Studio 2019 Microsoft Software License Terms, see Distributable Code Files for Microsoft Visual Studio 2019

To view the 'REDIST list' that's referenced in the 'Distributable Code' section of the Visual Studio 2017 Microsoft Software License Terms, see Distributable Code Files for Microsoft Visual Studio 2017.

To view the 'REDIST list' that's referenced in the 'Distributable Code' section of the Visual Studio 2015 Microsoft Software License Terms, see Distributable Code Files for Microsoft Visual Studio 2015.

For more information about redistributable files, see Determining which DLLs to redistribute and Deployment examples.

Locate the redistributable files

To deploy redistributable files, you can use the redistributable packages installed by Visual Studio. In versions of Visual Studio since 2017, these files are named vc_redist.arm64.exe, vc_redist.x64.exe, and vc_redist.x86.exe. In Visual Studio 2015, Visual Studio 2017, and Visual Studio 2019, they're also available under the names vcredist_x86.exe, vcredist_x64.exe, and vcredist_arm.exe (2015 only).

The easiest way to locate the redistributable files is by using environment variables set in a developer command prompt. In the latest version of Visual Studio 2019, you'll find the redistributable files in the %VCINSTALLDIR%RedistMSVCv142 folder. In both Visual Studio 2017 and Visual Studio 2019, they're also found in %VCToolsRedistDir%. In Visual Studio 2015, these files can be found in %VCINSTALLDIR%redist<locale>, where <locale> is the locale of the redistributable packages.

Another deployment option is to use redistributable merge modules (.msm files). In Visual Studio 2019, these files are part of an optional installable component named C++ 2019 Redistributable MSMs in the Visual Studio Installer. The merge modules are installed by default as part of a C++ install in Visual Studio 2017 and Visual Studio 2015. When installed in the latest version of Visual Studio 2019, you'll find the redistributable merge modules in %VCINSTALLDIR%RedistMSVCv142MergeModules. In both Visual Studio 2019 and Visual Studio 2017, they're also found in %VCToolsRedistDir%MergeModules. In Visual Studio 2015, they're found in Program Files [(x86)]Common FilesMerge Modules.

Install the redistributable packages

The Visual C++ Redistributable Packages install and register all Visual C++ libraries. If you use one, run it as a prerequisite on the target system before you install your application. We recommend that you use these packages for your deployments because they enable automatic updating of the Visual C++ libraries. For an example about how to use these packages, see Walkthrough: Deploying a Visual C++ Application By Using the Visual C++ Redistributable Package.

Each Visual C++ Redistributable Package checks for the existence of a more recent version on the machine. If a more recent version is found, the package won't get installed. Starting in Visual Studio 2015, redistributable packages display an error message stating that setup failed. If a package is run by using the /quiet flag, no error message is displayed. In either case, an error is logged by the Microsoft installer, and an error result is returned to the caller. Starting in Visual Studio 2015 packages, you can avoid this error by checking the registry to find out if a more recent version is installed. The current installed version number is stored in the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWARE[Wow6432Node]MicrosoftVisualStudio14.0VCRuntimes{x86 x64 ARM} key. The version number is 14.0 for Visual Studio 2015, Visual Studio 2017, and Visual Studio 2019 because the latest redistributable is binary compatible with the 2015 version. The key is ARM, x86, or x64 depending on the installed vcredist versions for the platform. (You need to check under the Wow6432Node subkey only if you're using Regedit to view the version of the installed x86 package on an x64 platform.) The version number is stored in the REG_SZ string value Version and also in the set of Major, Minor, Bld, and RbldREG_DWORD values. To avoid an error at install time, you must skip installation of the redistributable package if the currently installed version is more recent.

Install the redistributable merge modules

Redistributable merge modules must be included in the Windows Installer package (or similar installation package) that you use to deploy your application. For more information, see Redistributing By Using Merge Modules. For an example see Walkthrough: Deploying a Visual C++ Application By Using a Setup Project.

Install individual redistributable files

It's also possible to directly install the redistributable DLLs in the application local folder. That's the folder that contains your executable application file. For servicing reasons, we don't recommend you use this installation location.

Potential run-time errors

If Windows can't find one of the redistributable library DLLs required by your application, it may display a message similar to: 'This application has failed to start because library.dll was not found. Reinstalling the application may fix this problem.'

To resolve this kind of error, make sure your application installer builds correctly. Verify that the redistributable libraries get deployed correctly on the target system. For more information, see Understanding the Dependencies of a Visual C++ Application.

Related articles

Redistributing By Using Merge Modules
Describes how to use Visual C++ redistributable merge modules to install the Visual C++ runtime libraries as shared DLLs in the %windir%system32 folder.

Redistributing Visual C++ ActiveX Controls
Describes how to redistribute an application that uses ActiveX Controls.

Redistributing the MFC Library
Describes how to redistribute an application that uses MFC.

Redistributing an ATL application
Describes how to redistribute an application that uses ATL. Starting in Visual Studio 2012, no redistributable library for ATL is required.

Deployment Examples
Links to examples that demonstrate how to deploy Visual C++ applications.

Deploying Desktop Applications
Introduces Visual C++ deployment concepts and technologies.

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Note

This developer documentation applies to Visual Studio 2019. To see the documentation for your preferred version of Visual Studio, use the Version selector control. It's found at the top of the table of contents on this page.

If you're looking for a Microsoft Visual C++ 2019 redistributable package so that you can run a program, go to the Microsoft Visual Studio site's Downloads page. Under All Downloads, expand the Other Tools, Frameworks, and Redistributables section. Select your target architecture, then choose the Download button.

For older redistributables, open the Older downloads page. Expand the Other Tools, Frameworks, and Redistributables section. Find the redistributable version you want to download, select your target architecture, then choose the Download button.

C++

Note

This developer documentation applies to Visual Studio 2017. To see the documentation for your preferred version of Visual Studio, use the Version selector control. It's found at the top of the table of contents on this page.

If you're looking for a Microsoft Visual C++ 2017 or older redistributable package so that you can run a program, go to the Microsoft Visual Studio site's Older downloads page. Expand the Other Tools, Frameworks, and Redistributables section. Find the redistributable version you want to download, select your target architecture, then choose the Download button.

Note

This developer documentation applies to Visual Studio 2015. To see the documentation for your preferred version of Visual Studio, use the Version selector control. It's found at the top of the table of contents on this page.

If you're looking for a Microsoft Visual C++ 2015 or older redistributable package so that you can run a program, go to the Microsoft Visual Studio site's Older downloads page. Expand the Other Tools, Frameworks, and Redistributables section. Find the redistributable version you want to download, select your target architecture, then choose the Download button.

Microsoft Visual C++ (MSVC) refers to the C++, C, and assembly language development tools and libraries available as part of Visual Studio on Windows. These tools and libraries let you create Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps, native Windows desktop and server applications, cross-platform libraries and apps that run on Windows, Linux, Android, and iOS, as well as managed apps and libraries that use the .NET Framework. You can use MSVC to write anything from simple console apps to the most sophisticated and complex apps for Windows desktop, from device drivers and operating system components to cross-platform games for mobile devices, and from the smallest IoT devices to multi-server high performance computing in the Azure cloud.

Visual Studio 2015, 2017 and 2019 can be installed side-by-side. You can use Visual Studio 2019 (compiler toolset v142) or Visual Studio 2017 (v141) to edit and build programs using the toolset from Visual Studio 2017 (v141) and Visual Studio 2015 (v140).

What's New and Conformance History

What's New for C++ in Visual Studio
Find out what's new in Visual Studio.

What's New for C++ in Visual Studio 2003 through 2015
Find out what was new in C++ for each version of Visual Studio from 2003 through 2015.

C++ conformance improvements in Visual Studio
Learn about C++ conformance improvements in Visual Studio.

Microsoft C++ language conformance table
A list of conformance status by feature in the MSVC C++ compiler.

Microsoft C/C++ change history 2003 - 2015
Learn about the breaking changes in previous versions.

Install Visual Studio and upgrade from earlier versions

Install C++ support in Visual Studio
Download Visual Studio and install the Microsoft C/C++ toolset.

Microsoft C++ porting and upgrading guide
Guidance for porting code and upgrading projects to Visual Studio 2015 or later to take advantage of greater compiler conformance to the C++ standard as well as greatly improved compilation times and security features such as Spectre mitigation.

C++ tools and features in Visual Studio editions
Find out about different Visual Studio editions.

Supported platforms
Find out which platforms the Microsoft C/C++ compiler supports.

Learn C++

Welcome back to C++
Learn more about modern C++ programming techniques based on C++11 and later that enable you to write fast, safe code and avoid many of the pitfalls of C-style programming.

Standard C++
Learn about C++, get an overview of Modern C++, and find links to books, articles, talks, and events

Learn Visual Studio and make your first C++ project
Start learning how to write C++ in Visual Studio.

Visual Studio C++ samples
Information about the C++ code samples provided by Microsoft.

C++ development tools

Overview of C++ development in Visual Studio
How to use the Visual Studio IDE to create projects, edit code, link to libraries, compile, debug, create unit tests, do static analysis, deploy, and more.

Projects and build systems
How to create and configure Visual Studio C++ projects, CMake projects, and other kinds of projects with MSVC compiler and linker options.

Writing and refactoring C++ code
How to use the productivity features in the C++ editor to refactor, navigate, understand and write code.

Debugging native code
Use the Visual Studio debugger with C++ projects.

Code analysis for C/C++ overview
Use SAL annotations or the C++ Core Guidelines checkers to perform static analysis.

Write unit tests for C/C++ in Visual Studio
Create unit tests using the Microsoft Unit Testing Framework for C++, Google Test, Boost.Test, or CTest.

Write applications in C++

Universal Windows Apps (C++)
Find guides and reference content on the Windows Developer Center. For information about developing UWP apps, see Intro to the Universal Windows Platform and Create your first UWP app using C++.

Desktop applications (C++)
Learn how to create traditional native C++ desktop applications for Windows.

.NET programming with C++/CLI
Learn how to create DLLs that enable interoperability between native C++ and .NET programs written in languages such as C# or Visual Basic.

Linux programming
Use the Visual Studio IDE to code and deploy to a remote Linux machine for compilation with GCC.

Create C/C++ DLLs in Visual Studio
Find out how to use Win32, ATL, and MFC to create Windows desktop DLLs, and provides information about how to compile and register your DLL.

Parallel programming
Learn how to use the Parallel Patterns Library, C++ AMP, OpenMP, and other features that are related to multithreading on Windows.

Security best practices
Learn how to protect applications from malicious code and unauthorized use.

Cloud and web programming
In C++, you have several options for connecting to the web and the cloud.

Data access
Connect to databases using ODBC and OLE DB.

Text and strings
Learn about working with different text and string formats and encodings for local and international development.

Languages reference

C++ language reference
The reference guide to the Microsoft implementation of the C++ programming language.

C/C++ preprocessor reference
A common reference to the shared C and C++ language preprocessor.

C language reference
The reference guide to the Microsoft implementation of the C programming language.

Compiler intrinsics and assembly language
Guides to the compiler intrinsics supported or implemented by the Microsoft C/C++ compilers on each platform.

C++ Libraries in Visual Studio

The following sections provide information about the different C and C++ libraries that are included in Visual Studio.

C runtime library reference
Includes security-enhanced alternatives to functions that are known to pose security issues.

C++ standard library
The C++ Standard Library.

Active Template Library (ATL)
Support for COM components and apps.

Microsoft Foundation Class (MFC) libraries
Support for creating desktop apps that have traditional or Office-style user interfaces.

Parallel Patterns Library (PPL)
Asynchronous and parallel algorithms that execute on the CPU.

Visual C++2019 Redistributable Package

C++ AMP (C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism)
Massively parallel algorithms that execute on the GPU.

Windows Runtime Template Library (WRL)
Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps and components.

.NET programming with C++/CLI
Programming for the common language runtime (CLR).

Third-party open source C++ libraries

The cross-platform vcpkg command-line tool greatly simplifies the discovery and installation of over 900 C++ open source libraries. See vcpkg: C++ Package Manager for Windows.

Feedback and community

Microsoft Docs Q&A
Microsoft Docs hosts searchable forums for questions and answers. Add a C++ tag to your post for community assistance on C++-related issues.

Microsoft visual c++ 2019 redistributable for visual studio 2019

Microsoft Visual C++ 2019 Redistributable For Visual Studio 2019 Download

How to report a problem with the Microsoft C/C++ toolset
Learn how to create effective error reports against the Microsoft C/C++ toolset (compiler, linker, and other tools), and ways to submit your report.

Microsoft C++ Team Blog
Learn more about new features and the latest information from the developers of the C++ tools in Visual Studio.

Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable Package

Visual Studio C++ Developer Community
Get help, file bugs, and make suggestions for C++ in Visual Studio.