Pop Art Fashion Designers

Pop Art Fashion Designers

Among all the artistic currents, the one most loved and celebrated by designers is certainly Pop Art. Emerging in England in the mid-1950s, but fully exploded in New York in the early 1960s, it has made media and advertising its favorite subjects, merging elements of everyday objects, portraits of famous people, comics. Here are nine fashion designers who were inspired by art. Yves Saint Laurent Yves Saint Laurent was a designer who believed that fashion is art. He had an art collection which included works by Henri Matisse, James Ensor, Constantin Brancusi, and Pablo Picasso. Being an art fan, it’s no surprise it was one of his sources of inspiration. The show was billed as the first-in-depth survey of art, design and architecture of the 1970’s and 80’s and was helpful for a contemporary age self-aware generation seeking a way forward. They had reached a stage where they are trying to find out what their parents and grandparents were on about by embracing 50’s fashion passionately.

Historically, very few fashion designers have become famous “name” designers, such as Coco Chanel or Calvin Klein, who create prestigious high-fashion collections, whether couture or prêt-á-porter (“ready-to-wear”). These designers are influential in setting trends in fashion, but, contrary to popular belief, they do not dictate new styles; rather, they endeavour to design clothes that will meet consumer demand. The vast majority of designers work in anonymity for manufacturers, as part of design teams, adapting trendsetting styles into marketable garments for average consumers. Designers draw inspiration from a wide range of sources, including film and television costumes, street styles, and active sportswear. For most designers, traditional design methods, such as doing sketches on paper and draping fabric on mannequins, have been supplemented or replaced by computer-assisted design techniques. These allow designers to rapidly make changes to a proposed design’s silhouette, fabric, trimmings, and other elements and afford them the ability to instantaneously share the proposed changes with colleagues—whether in the next room or on another continent.

Only a minuscule number of designers and manufacturers produce innovative high-fashion apparel. An even smaller number (mostly in Paris) produce haute couture. Most manufacturers produce moderate-priced or budget apparel. Some companies use their own production facilities for some or all of the manufacturing process, but most rely on separately owned manufacturing firms or contractors to produce garments to the fashion company’s specifications. In the field of women’s apparel, manufacturers typically produce several product lines (collections) a year, which they deliver to retailers at predetermined times of the year. Some “fast fashion” manufacturers produce new merchandise even more frequently. An entire product development team is involved in planning a line and developing the designs. The materials (fabric, linings, buttons, etc.) need to be sourced and ordered, and samples need to be made for presentation to retail buyers.

An important stage in garment production is the translation of the clothing design into a pattern in a range of sizes. Because the proportions of the human body change with increases or decreases in weight, patterns cannot simply be scaled up or down uniformly from a basic template. Pattern making was traditionally a highly skilled profession. In the early 21st century, despite innovations in computer programming, designs in larger sizes are difficult to adjust for every figure. Whatever the size, the pattern—whether drawn on paper or programmed as a set of computer instructions—determines how fabric is cut into the pieces that will be joined to make a garment. For all but the most expensive clothing, fabric cutting is accomplished by computer-guided knives or high-intensity lasers that can cut many layers of fabric at once.

The next stage of production involves the assembly of the garment. Here too, technological innovation, including the development of computer-guided machinery, resulted in the automation of some stages of garment assembly. Nevertheless, the fundamental process of sewing remains labour-intensive. This puts inexorable pressure on clothing manufacturers to seek out low-wage environments for the location of their factories, where issues of industrial safety and the exploitation of workers often arise. The fashion industry in New York City was dominated by sweatshops located on the Lower East Side until the Triangle shirtwaist factory fire of 1911 led to greater unionization and regulation of the industry in the United States. In the late 20th century China emerged as the world’s largest producer of clothing because of its low labour costs and highly disciplined workforce.

Assembled garments go through various processes collectively known as “finishing.” These include the addition of decorative elements (embroidery, beading); buttons and buttonholes, hooks and eyes, snaps, zippers, and other fasteners; hems and cuffs; and brand-name labels and other labels (often legally required) specifying fibre content, laundry instructions, and country of manufacture. Finished garments are then pressed and packed for shipment.

For much of the period following World War II, trade in textiles and garments was strictly regulated by importing countries, which imposed quotas and tariffs. These protectionist measures, which were intended (ultimately without success) to prevent textile and clothing production from moving from high-wage to low-wage countries, were gradually abandoned beginning in the 1980s. They were replaced by a free-trade approach, under the regulatory aegis of the World Trade Organization and other international regulatory bodies, that recognized the competitive advantage of low-wage countries but also the advantage provided to consumers in rich countries through the availability of highly affordable apparel. The advent of containerization and relatively inexpensive air freight also made it possible for production to be closely tied to market conditions even across globe-spanning distances.

Although usually not considered part of the apparel industry for trade and statistical purposes, the manufacture and sale of accessories, such as shoes and handbags, and underwear are closely allied with the fashion industry. As with garments, the production of accessories ranges from very expensive luxury goods to inexpensive mass-produced items. Like apparel manufacturing, accessory production tends to gravitate to low-wage environments. Producers of high-end accessories, especially handbags, are plagued by competition from counterfeit goods (“knockoffs”), sometimes produced using inferior materials in the same factories as the authentic goods. The trade in such imitation goods is illegal under various international agreements but is difficult to control. It costs name-brand manufacturers hundreds of millions of dollars annually in lost sales.

Designers

Sam and Cailli talk art, food and fashion with pop-art designer Philip Colbert

On Cailli (left): Dress, $2,285, The Rodnik Band. On Sam: Dress, $2,125, and bag, both The Rodnik Band. On Philip: Suit and bag, both The Rodnik Band. Hat, Rodnik x Peanuts. (Photo: Jaclyn Locke)

Sam: So what does “The Rodnik Band” mean?

Philip: It’s a fashion label with the word “band” in it. There is a real band, but it’s not the musical kind. It’s basically the Velvet Underground of fashion. That’s what I say, anyway!

Cailli: Do you actually have to be good to be in the band?

Philip: No, it’s all about spirit! Talent can be finicky and boring, but good spirit is everything.

Cailli: Can we be your backup singers? That’s what I’m really hoping.

Pop Art Fashion Designers

Philip: Yeah, you guys could totally jam!

Pop Art Fashion Designer

Cailli: Tell us what inspires your designs. You’re obviously a fan of food and pop art.

Philip: I think of Rodnik as a pop-art brand. I’m not really into normal fashion, which I see as a regime of trends. After a while, it can be quite vacuous. I’m much more into the idea of making clothes like an artist. Every season I continue the narrative. The clothes are like wearable artworks.

Cailli: How do you interpret fashion as art?

Philip: For me, creativity is about blurring genres, especially fashion and art. Fashion can be a powerful democratic platform to express yourself.

Sam: We’re obsessed with your meat accessories, even though we’re vegetarians.

“Philip makes the most scrumptious hambags! Nom, nom, nom, nom.” (Photo: Jaclyn Locke)

Pop Art Fashion Designers Images

The Rodnik Band Pop-up Shop

Rodnik x Peanuts cotton dress, $150, therodnikband.com

Pop Art Fashion Designers Pictures

“Pop art, not war! We’re obsessed with Philip’s Peanuts collab.” (Photo: Jaclyn Locke)